Oddity Central

Oddity Central

Indianapolis Pizza Shop Offering Patrons a Free XL Pizza in Exchange for a Gun Off the Streets

Posted: 01 Sep 2016 10:18 AM PDT

After making some of the most delicious pizza on the east side if Indianapolis for the last three decades, the owner of D & C Pizza has come up with anew recipe that he hopes will take guns off the streets and reduce the high crime rate.

Donald Dancy wants to offer a free extra-large pizza to anyone who turns in a gun at his shop. It may seem like a strange tradeoff since pizza is relatively cheap while guns sell for hundreds of dollars on the street, but the pizza shop owner says he has lots of customers who carry illegal guns and would be more than glad to take advantage of the unusual promotion. His plan is to hold the guns in a safe place until police officers arrive to pick them up.

"I can see kids 14 through 18 coming in here and buying a pizza and their guns fall out," Dancy said. "When you pass here right off of 36th and go all the way down to 25th street and over, it is like a war zone. It is not getting any better."


Mexican Farmers Fight Drought with Solid Rain

Posted: 01 Sep 2016 07:16 AM PDT

You may not of heard of it before, but Solid Rain has been helping Mexican farmers fights severe droughts for over a decade. The miracle powder is actually a super absorbent polymer that can soak up water up to 500 times its original size and keep it in the ground for up to a year.

The story of Solid Rain began in 1970, when the United States Department of Agriculture developed a super absorbent product made from a type of starch known as "super slurper". In the U.S., it has mainly been used in disposable diapers, to help keep baby bottoms dry, but a Mexican chemical engineer saw this magic powder as an opportunity to effectively fight the drought plaguing his country.

Sergio Rico Velasco developed and patented a different version of potassium polyacrylate that could be mixed with soil and slowly feed water to plants over a long period of time. His company, Solid Rain, has been quietly selling the product to Mexican farmers for over 10 years now.


Recycling Crusader Uses Simple Garbage to Build Houses for the Poor

Posted: 01 Sep 2016 06:59 AM PDT

For the past five decades, Nargis Latif  has been actively advocating for the recycling of trash in Pakistan as an alternative to simply burning it all and raising pollution levels. But perhaps her greatest achievement has been developing a technique of building cheap housing for the poor of Karachi out of blocks of dry waste.

Nargis Latif's inspiring story began in the 1960s, with a quarrel over burning trash outside her apartment. She fought hard and managed to get the burning point moved, but that was not her real goal. She wanted people to start using their waste, instead of simply discarding it or burning it, but that meant arguing with individuals who simply did not understand the benefits of recycling. So she decided to use a language they would understand – money.


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